Dryness Becoming A Big Problem, But Relief May Be On The Way

Dryness Becoming A Big Problem, But Relief May Be On The Way

Dryness Becoming A Big Problem, But Relief May Be On The Way


Lance Shepherd

In many parts of Indiana, the rain has been scattered. With 80 and 90 degree temperatures, newly planted corn is struggling to get started.  April saw above normal precipitation, but May saw below average rainfall. While planting and germination went quickly, Lance Shepherd, with DuPont Pioneer, says some areas have been missed by rain and are struggling, “There are some areas where the rains have not come, and the seeds are just sitting there in the dirt.”

In some areas after good emergence, crops are moving backwards without timely rains. “In these areas, there was rain that started germination; but now it has turned dry, and the roots are not developing,” Shephard said.

In other areas in the north where it has been too wet and areas of Eastern Indiana where it has been too dry, planting is lagging behind as we roll from May into June. Shephard advised, “We are getting questions about switching to shorter season hybrids. In these areas, if you are not done planting this week, then you should consider switching.”

A tropical depression moving up from the Gulf of Mexico may bring the relief we need.  HAT meteorologist Ryan Martin says, beginning late tonight and into Wednesday, we would see 90% coverage statewide with 0.25 to 2 inches possible.

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